Monday, April 21, 2008

John Adams

I have been fascinated with the historical perspective of John Adams, an HBO mini-series, based on the book by David McCullough and would like to share a line from the seventh episode that grabbed my attention.

Allow me to bring some context to this particular scene - John Adams at 90, is walking on his farm with his son Thomas while reflecting, as he does, on his life now that his beloved wife Abigail has passed.

I have some scruples of conscious enough whether I ought to be preserved or whether it would be charity of me to stumble. Still, still I am not weary of life. Strangely. I have hope. You take away hope and what remains? What pleasures? Do you follow me Thomas?

"It's getting late father, let's go inside," Thomas said.

Come here, come here. I have seen a queen of France with 18 million livres of diamonds on her person, but I declare that all the charms of her face and figure added to all the glitter of her jewels did not impress me as much as that little shrub right there. Now your mother always said that I never delighted enough in the mundane, but now I find that if I look at even the smallest thing my imagination begins to roam the milk way.

Rejoice evermore.
Rejoice evermore.

Oh, I wish that it was always in my heart and in my tongue.
This to me is like poetry that strums the heart strings, and really the entire series is smothered in writing that brings such life to our American story. Watching this show has provided me the opportunity to consider the challenges of life in the late 1700's and surely reminds me that there is much to be thankful for.

Rejoice evermore and strive to delight in the mundane...

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2 comments:

  1. Anonymous5:02 PM

    Yes, Rejoice evermore, that was my favorite scene of the episode.

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  2. Anonymous10:58 PM

    the entire 7 shows were magnificent. Rejoice evermore- what an ending. The last line about "YOu will never know how hard we worked for your freedom, use it wisely, or I will repent in heaven for putting forth half the effort"(not accurate- but you get thie drift). We have used it wisely but will we continue

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